Contemplating Joseph

One of my favorite biblical people is Joseph (Genesis 37-50).

Because of his youthful arrogance and being Jacob’s favorite son, his older brothers first wanted to kill him, but instead sold him into slavery.

He endured many a hardship since, but in the end wielded power second only to Egypt’s Pharaoh. No matter what Joseph endured, he did so worshiping God.

I wish I could say I do the same. I tend to whine when life doesn’t go my way, especially where writing is concerned. I point out all my hard work and say, “Why does success continue to elude me?” I work and work, I study until my eyes blur, and still it’s not enough.

Maybe it’s my definition of success that needs re-evaluation.

So often I focus only on the goal – to see my novels on a bookstore shelf. Yet when I approach editors and agents, they tell me either I need to polish my writing even more, or it’s not saleable. Didn’t God give me the story and the desire to write it? Does he not want people to read the story? After all, every time I think about giving up, he pushes me forward.

He also reminds me of Joseph. It’s not always about the goal, but the knowledge and wisdom gained during the journey.

Joseph’s hardships are what prepared him for Pharaoh. He used what he learned as a slave and in prison to earn people’s trust and ended up saving Egypt from a seven-year famine. He also learned the value of humility and keeping faith in God no matter what his circumstances. Without his integrity and unswerving faith in God, he would not have survived.

During my devotion time I will continue to study and contemplate Joseph’s life. I want to be able to enjoy and appreciate the journey God forged for me. Though my goals are important, what God wants to teach me takes precedence.

In looking back, when I first began writing my novel now almost seven years ago, within those years I learned more about the craft. All my writing has improved immeasurably since. God asking me to wait tells me to continue to study and make my writing shine even more. To wait doesn’t mean to sit around, but to continue to work towards God’s goals.

I just realized from the previous sentence I need to focus less on me, and more on God. How I reach my goals isn’t my doing, but God’s. I must remember to trust God’s wisdom, and when he tells me I’m not ready for something, I’m not. 

To work as I wait is a far better use of my time than complaining about it.

4 thoughts on “Contemplating Joseph

  1. “Wait patiently for the Lord. Be brave and courageous. Yes, wait patiently for the Lord.” Psalm 27:14
    I always figured the repeat of “yes wait patiently” was for me to drill it into my head. But the “brave and courageous” part didn’t seem to fit with a sitting down on my behind idea. It doesn’t. It’s actively waiting. It’s making use of this waiting time to learn all God desires to teach you about Him.
    Karen Kingsbury said at the conference, “Be the pen in God’s hand.” God may have you write something else for Him right now and what you think is today’s timing is actually better timing for the future. “It’s in the struggle that you learn to fly.” Karen said. “It’s where you get your wings.”
    Learn to fly my dear friend!!

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  2. But what if I’m afraid to fly?
    Kidding.
    I’m more like the little bird whose wings haven’t fully grown and watches the adult birds with envy and impatience.

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  3. Hey, Joseph is also a really cool musical with Donny!
    Sorry, had to say it.
    Did you see at the Spa there’s a new Inspirational publisher that wants inspirationals in several genres? The Wild Rose Press’s new imprint, the White Rose Press.

    Like

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